christine on her own
A Los Angeles gal now in San Francisco, discovering a new city and museum, while filling my mind with art, food, fashion, design, books, and places I've never been to.

This Tumblr started when I discovered myself on my own. And though there are many incredible people in my life, including my partner and co-adventurer P, I still consider this a place of my own to think, explore, share, and be inspired.
christine on her own
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whereiseefashion:

Match #71
Shalom Harlow for Numéro #108 by Sofia Sanchez & Mauro Mongiello wearing Alexander McQueen | Sleeping Swan by Nigel French
More matches here 

Thanks to Artsy, I was clued in to this incredible blog pairing images of fashion with beautiful imagery found all around—in art, architecture, nature, food, other parts of the world. Working in the arts combined with my intense passion for Pinterest has often led me to see these types of parallels. This Tumblr really takes these juxtapositions to an awe-inspiring level. 
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One of the greatest perks of my job is working with artists and introducing their work to both longtime fans and those unfamiliar. There is nothing more gratifying than that moment when someone connects with a piece or sees an artist anew. 
For SFMOMA’s newest collaborative exhibition with Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Public Intimacy, I had the pleasure of meeting Johannesburg-based artist Kemang Wa Lehulere who created this chalk work, The Grass Is Always Greener On the Other Side. In explaining the title, he spoke about an anti-apartheid South African writer who emigrated to the U.S. seeking a better life, but realized upon arrival, he faced inequalities and prejudice even in the land of opportunity.
Having been raised by first generation immigrants, I understood the sentiment, along with the challenges and complex emotions minorities face in America. Art has this powerful way of surfacing narratives that resonate not only in its place of origin, but also globally, especially now in the digital age.
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Although I love the familiar sight and sounds of hearing kids running through this Soto installation, this is quite possibly the most luminescent I have ever seen it (at Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA))
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A great day of taking in one of our newest On the Go exhibitions, Project Los Altos, especially this weathered Chris Johanson door subtly sited in the orchard (at Downtown Los Altos)
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instagram:

Do-Ho Suh’s Home within a Home



For more views from inside Do-Ho Suh’s “Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home,” browse the #dohosuh and #서도호 hashtags and see the  National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea (국립현대미술관 서울관) location page.



In Seoul, South Korea’s National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, visitors are finding a peculiar, life-size home nested within the walls of another home.

The full name of the 12x15m (40x49ft) giant installation is "Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home" (집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집), and it’s the largest work by Korean artist Do-Ho Suh (서도호) to date. Made to scale out of layers of translucent blue silk, the two houses are exact replicas of residences the artist lived in as a child in Korea and in the United States. The effect is a pair of disorienting, 3D blueprints that visitors to the Seoul Box area of the museum can walk through until 14 May 2014.

Always in awe of Do Ho Suh’s work
instagram:

Do-Ho Suh’s Home within a Home



For more views from inside Do-Ho Suh’s “Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home,” browse the #dohosuh and #서도호 hashtags and see the  National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea (국립현대미술관 서울관) location page.



In Seoul, South Korea’s National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, visitors are finding a peculiar, life-size home nested within the walls of another home.

The full name of the 12x15m (40x49ft) giant installation is "Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home" (집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집), and it’s the largest work by Korean artist Do-Ho Suh (서도호) to date. Made to scale out of layers of translucent blue silk, the two houses are exact replicas of residences the artist lived in as a child in Korea and in the United States. The effect is a pair of disorienting, 3D blueprints that visitors to the Seoul Box area of the museum can walk through until 14 May 2014.

Always in awe of Do Ho Suh’s work
instagram:

Do-Ho Suh’s Home within a Home



For more views from inside Do-Ho Suh’s “Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home,” browse the #dohosuh and #서도호 hashtags and see the  National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea (국립현대미술관 서울관) location page.



In Seoul, South Korea’s National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, visitors are finding a peculiar, life-size home nested within the walls of another home.

The full name of the 12x15m (40x49ft) giant installation is "Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home" (집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집), and it’s the largest work by Korean artist Do-Ho Suh (서도호) to date. Made to scale out of layers of translucent blue silk, the two houses are exact replicas of residences the artist lived in as a child in Korea and in the United States. The effect is a pair of disorienting, 3D blueprints that visitors to the Seoul Box area of the museum can walk through until 14 May 2014.

Always in awe of Do Ho Suh’s work
instagram:

Do-Ho Suh’s Home within a Home



For more views from inside Do-Ho Suh’s “Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home,” browse the #dohosuh and #서도호 hashtags and see the  National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea (국립현대미술관 서울관) location page.



In Seoul, South Korea’s National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, visitors are finding a peculiar, life-size home nested within the walls of another home.

The full name of the 12x15m (40x49ft) giant installation is "Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home" (집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집), and it’s the largest work by Korean artist Do-Ho Suh (서도호) to date. Made to scale out of layers of translucent blue silk, the two houses are exact replicas of residences the artist lived in as a child in Korea and in the United States. The effect is a pair of disorienting, 3D blueprints that visitors to the Seoul Box area of the museum can walk through until 14 May 2014.

Always in awe of Do Ho Suh’s work
instagram:

Do-Ho Suh’s Home within a Home



For more views from inside Do-Ho Suh’s “Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home,” browse the #dohosuh and #서도호 hashtags and see the  National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea (국립현대미술관 서울관) location page.



In Seoul, South Korea’s National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, visitors are finding a peculiar, life-size home nested within the walls of another home.

The full name of the 12x15m (40x49ft) giant installation is "Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home" (집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집), and it’s the largest work by Korean artist Do-Ho Suh (서도호) to date. Made to scale out of layers of translucent blue silk, the two houses are exact replicas of residences the artist lived in as a child in Korea and in the United States. The effect is a pair of disorienting, 3D blueprints that visitors to the Seoul Box area of the museum can walk through until 14 May 2014.

Always in awe of Do Ho Suh’s work
instagram:

Do-Ho Suh’s Home within a Home



For more views from inside Do-Ho Suh’s “Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home,” browse the #dohosuh and #서도호 hashtags and see the  National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea (국립현대미술관 서울관) location page.



In Seoul, South Korea’s National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, visitors are finding a peculiar, life-size home nested within the walls of another home.

The full name of the 12x15m (40x49ft) giant installation is "Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home" (집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집), and it’s the largest work by Korean artist Do-Ho Suh (서도호) to date. Made to scale out of layers of translucent blue silk, the two houses are exact replicas of residences the artist lived in as a child in Korea and in the United States. The effect is a pair of disorienting, 3D blueprints that visitors to the Seoul Box area of the museum can walk through until 14 May 2014.

Always in awe of Do Ho Suh’s work
instagram:

Do-Ho Suh’s Home within a Home



For more views from inside Do-Ho Suh’s “Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home,” browse the #dohosuh and #서도호 hashtags and see the  National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea (국립현대미술관 서울관) location page.



In Seoul, South Korea’s National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, visitors are finding a peculiar, life-size home nested within the walls of another home.

The full name of the 12x15m (40x49ft) giant installation is "Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home" (집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집), and it’s the largest work by Korean artist Do-Ho Suh (서도호) to date. Made to scale out of layers of translucent blue silk, the two houses are exact replicas of residences the artist lived in as a child in Korea and in the United States. The effect is a pair of disorienting, 3D blueprints that visitors to the Seoul Box area of the museum can walk through until 14 May 2014.

Always in awe of Do Ho Suh’s work
instagram:

Do-Ho Suh’s Home within a Home



For more views from inside Do-Ho Suh’s “Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home,” browse the #dohosuh and #서도호 hashtags and see the  National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea (국립현대미술관 서울관) location page.



In Seoul, South Korea’s National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, visitors are finding a peculiar, life-size home nested within the walls of another home.

The full name of the 12x15m (40x49ft) giant installation is "Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home" (집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집), and it’s the largest work by Korean artist Do-Ho Suh (서도호) to date. Made to scale out of layers of translucent blue silk, the two houses are exact replicas of residences the artist lived in as a child in Korea and in the United States. The effect is a pair of disorienting, 3D blueprints that visitors to the Seoul Box area of the museum can walk through until 14 May 2014.

Always in awe of Do Ho Suh’s work
instagram:

Do-Ho Suh’s Home within a Home



For more views from inside Do-Ho Suh’s “Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home,” browse the #dohosuh and #서도호 hashtags and see the  National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea (국립현대미술관 서울관) location page.



In Seoul, South Korea’s National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, visitors are finding a peculiar, life-size home nested within the walls of another home.

The full name of the 12x15m (40x49ft) giant installation is "Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home" (집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집), and it’s the largest work by Korean artist Do-Ho Suh (서도호) to date. Made to scale out of layers of translucent blue silk, the two houses are exact replicas of residences the artist lived in as a child in Korea and in the United States. The effect is a pair of disorienting, 3D blueprints that visitors to the Seoul Box area of the museum can walk through until 14 May 2014.

Always in awe of Do Ho Suh’s work
instagram:

Do-Ho Suh’s Home within a Home



For more views from inside Do-Ho Suh’s “Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home,” browse the #dohosuh and #서도호 hashtags and see the  National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea (국립현대미술관 서울관) location page.



In Seoul, South Korea’s National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, visitors are finding a peculiar, life-size home nested within the walls of another home.

The full name of the 12x15m (40x49ft) giant installation is "Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home" (집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집 속의 집), and it’s the largest work by Korean artist Do-Ho Suh (서도호) to date. Made to scale out of layers of translucent blue silk, the two houses are exact replicas of residences the artist lived in as a child in Korea and in the United States. The effect is a pair of disorienting, 3D blueprints that visitors to the Seoul Box area of the museum can walk through until 14 May 2014.

Always in awe of Do Ho Suh’s work
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Stumbling upon this performance inside the old 16th Street Station for the SF/Oakland Station to Station finale was something
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sfmoma:

stn-to-stn:

theesatisfaction:

The glorious @stntostn train! #tracksts (at Alvarado Transportation Center (Rail Runner, ABQRide))

<3

The Station to Station train is heading our way, Bay Area! Did you know that proceeds generated from ticket sales support SFMOMA? (This makes us both happy and sad to report that the event is sold out. You can still support us by donating to the Station to Station Cultural Fund, though!)

Can’t wait for the finale in Oakland/SF!
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A media field trip for our SECA Art Award exhibition brings us to this incredible site. David Wilson created a drawing on scale that somehow stands up to the monumental redwoods (at Presidio of San Francisco)
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lacma:

"I think he’s one of the greatest artists of our time," said LACMA director Michael Govan, who had worked with De Maria for a number of years. “I think there’s a quality to his work that is singular. It was sublime and direct."
Walter De Maria, celebrated sculptor, dies at 77 - latimes.com)

RIP, Walter de Maria. It has been immensely satisfying to experience your work in LACMA’s space. I particularly enjoyed that after a first look, self-proclaimed non-art-savvy friends would take another look, then another, noticing and slowly appreciating the subtle details of your piece. 
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lacma:

Here it is: photos of Peter Zumthor’s proposed new building for LACMA. See & share even more here.
Over on Unframed, LACMA’s director Michael Govan writes about the years of thought that have gone into this project:
What if, instead of being hidden, a museum’s collections were visible even when they were in storage? What if art objects could be methodically rotated to describe many cultural stories and not just one chronological and geographic historical narrative? What if there could be a comfortable and seamless transition from the casual space of an outdoor plaza to the inner sanctum of a meditative gallery? Could a museum have lots of windows to see outside, could kids be accommodated as easily as art historians, and could an arrangement of coincident spaces be suited to contemplation, education, or just hanging out? And instead of being a notorious energy hog, could a public museum building collect the energy of the sun to give back to its environment? Could the art museum’s architecture be reconsidered from scratch?
You can see these models, and much more, in The Presence of the Past: Peter Zumthor Reconsiders LACMA, opening to members tomorrow and to the public on Sunday.

So exciting to see this project develop, and can’t wait to view the exhibition. From what I’ve seen so far, the plan is bold, thoughtful, forward-looking, open, and very, very different than the museum norm — exactly what LA needs. 
lacma:

Here it is: photos of Peter Zumthor’s proposed new building for LACMA. See & share even more here.
Over on Unframed, LACMA’s director Michael Govan writes about the years of thought that have gone into this project:
What if, instead of being hidden, a museum’s collections were visible even when they were in storage? What if art objects could be methodically rotated to describe many cultural stories and not just one chronological and geographic historical narrative? What if there could be a comfortable and seamless transition from the casual space of an outdoor plaza to the inner sanctum of a meditative gallery? Could a museum have lots of windows to see outside, could kids be accommodated as easily as art historians, and could an arrangement of coincident spaces be suited to contemplation, education, or just hanging out? And instead of being a notorious energy hog, could a public museum building collect the energy of the sun to give back to its environment? Could the art museum’s architecture be reconsidered from scratch?
You can see these models, and much more, in The Presence of the Past: Peter Zumthor Reconsiders LACMA, opening to members tomorrow and to the public on Sunday.

So exciting to see this project develop, and can’t wait to view the exhibition. From what I’ve seen so far, the plan is bold, thoughtful, forward-looking, open, and very, very different than the museum norm — exactly what LA needs. 
lacma:

Here it is: photos of Peter Zumthor’s proposed new building for LACMA. See & share even more here.
Over on Unframed, LACMA’s director Michael Govan writes about the years of thought that have gone into this project:
What if, instead of being hidden, a museum’s collections were visible even when they were in storage? What if art objects could be methodically rotated to describe many cultural stories and not just one chronological and geographic historical narrative? What if there could be a comfortable and seamless transition from the casual space of an outdoor plaza to the inner sanctum of a meditative gallery? Could a museum have lots of windows to see outside, could kids be accommodated as easily as art historians, and could an arrangement of coincident spaces be suited to contemplation, education, or just hanging out? And instead of being a notorious energy hog, could a public museum building collect the energy of the sun to give back to its environment? Could the art museum’s architecture be reconsidered from scratch?
You can see these models, and much more, in The Presence of the Past: Peter Zumthor Reconsiders LACMA, opening to members tomorrow and to the public on Sunday.

So exciting to see this project develop, and can’t wait to view the exhibition. From what I’ve seen so far, the plan is bold, thoughtful, forward-looking, open, and very, very different than the museum norm — exactly what LA needs. 
lacma:

Here it is: photos of Peter Zumthor’s proposed new building for LACMA. See & share even more here.
Over on Unframed, LACMA’s director Michael Govan writes about the years of thought that have gone into this project:
What if, instead of being hidden, a museum’s collections were visible even when they were in storage? What if art objects could be methodically rotated to describe many cultural stories and not just one chronological and geographic historical narrative? What if there could be a comfortable and seamless transition from the casual space of an outdoor plaza to the inner sanctum of a meditative gallery? Could a museum have lots of windows to see outside, could kids be accommodated as easily as art historians, and could an arrangement of coincident spaces be suited to contemplation, education, or just hanging out? And instead of being a notorious energy hog, could a public museum building collect the energy of the sun to give back to its environment? Could the art museum’s architecture be reconsidered from scratch?
You can see these models, and much more, in The Presence of the Past: Peter Zumthor Reconsiders LACMA, opening to members tomorrow and to the public on Sunday.

So exciting to see this project develop, and can’t wait to view the exhibition. From what I’ve seen so far, the plan is bold, thoughtful, forward-looking, open, and very, very different than the museum norm — exactly what LA needs. 
lacma:

Here it is: photos of Peter Zumthor’s proposed new building for LACMA. See & share even more here.
Over on Unframed, LACMA’s director Michael Govan writes about the years of thought that have gone into this project:
What if, instead of being hidden, a museum’s collections were visible even when they were in storage? What if art objects could be methodically rotated to describe many cultural stories and not just one chronological and geographic historical narrative? What if there could be a comfortable and seamless transition from the casual space of an outdoor plaza to the inner sanctum of a meditative gallery? Could a museum have lots of windows to see outside, could kids be accommodated as easily as art historians, and could an arrangement of coincident spaces be suited to contemplation, education, or just hanging out? And instead of being a notorious energy hog, could a public museum building collect the energy of the sun to give back to its environment? Could the art museum’s architecture be reconsidered from scratch?
You can see these models, and much more, in The Presence of the Past: Peter Zumthor Reconsiders LACMA, opening to members tomorrow and to the public on Sunday.

So exciting to see this project develop, and can’t wait to view the exhibition. From what I’ve seen so far, the plan is bold, thoughtful, forward-looking, open, and very, very different than the museum norm — exactly what LA needs. 
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art21:

“It was important that people come to value light as we value gold, silver, paintings, objects.” —James Turrell
New video from the Exclusive series: James Turrell, our current 100 Artists featured artist, describes the values and perceptions of light while revisiting one of his “skyspace” works, Second Meeting (1989).
WATCH: James Turrell: “Second Meeting”
IMAGES: Production stills from the Exclusive film, James Turrell: “Second Meeting”. © Art21, Inc. 2013.


To say I’m excited for the Turrell retrospective at LACMA is an understatement.
art21:

“It was important that people come to value light as we value gold, silver, paintings, objects.” —James Turrell
New video from the Exclusive series: James Turrell, our current 100 Artists featured artist, describes the values and perceptions of light while revisiting one of his “skyspace” works, Second Meeting (1989).
WATCH: James Turrell: “Second Meeting”
IMAGES: Production stills from the Exclusive film, James Turrell: “Second Meeting”. © Art21, Inc. 2013.


To say I’m excited for the Turrell retrospective at LACMA is an understatement.
art21:

“It was important that people come to value light as we value gold, silver, paintings, objects.” —James Turrell
New video from the Exclusive series: James Turrell, our current 100 Artists featured artist, describes the values and perceptions of light while revisiting one of his “skyspace” works, Second Meeting (1989).
WATCH: James Turrell: “Second Meeting”
IMAGES: Production stills from the Exclusive film, James Turrell: “Second Meeting”. © Art21, Inc. 2013.


To say I’m excited for the Turrell retrospective at LACMA is an understatement.
art21:

“It was important that people come to value light as we value gold, silver, paintings, objects.” —James Turrell
New video from the Exclusive series: James Turrell, our current 100 Artists featured artist, describes the values and perceptions of light while revisiting one of his “skyspace” works, Second Meeting (1989).
WATCH: James Turrell: “Second Meeting”
IMAGES: Production stills from the Exclusive film, James Turrell: “Second Meeting”. © Art21, Inc. 2013.


To say I’m excited for the Turrell retrospective at LACMA is an understatement.
art21:

“It was important that people come to value light as we value gold, silver, paintings, objects.” —James Turrell
New video from the Exclusive series: James Turrell, our current 100 Artists featured artist, describes the values and perceptions of light while revisiting one of his “skyspace” works, Second Meeting (1989).
WATCH: James Turrell: “Second Meeting”
IMAGES: Production stills from the Exclusive film, James Turrell: “Second Meeting”. © Art21, Inc. 2013.


To say I’m excited for the Turrell retrospective at LACMA is an understatement.
art21:

“It was important that people come to value light as we value gold, silver, paintings, objects.” —James Turrell
New video from the Exclusive series: James Turrell, our current 100 Artists featured artist, describes the values and perceptions of light while revisiting one of his “skyspace” works, Second Meeting (1989).
WATCH: James Turrell: “Second Meeting”
IMAGES: Production stills from the Exclusive film, James Turrell: “Second Meeting”. © Art21, Inc. 2013.


To say I’m excited for the Turrell retrospective at LACMA is an understatement.
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lacma:

art21:

“Generally, we use light—we don’t really pay much attention to light itself. That’s my interest: this fascination with light and how we come to light.” —James Turrell
Happy birthday today (May 6) to artist James Turrell.
Seen here is the The Light Inside (1999), commissioned by and installed at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. The Light Inside is installed in the underground tunnel that links the museum’s Caroline Wiess Law Building with the Audrey Jones Beck Building.
This scene is featured in the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 1 episode, Spirituality (2001).
WATCH James Turrell in Spirituality: Preview | Full Segment [available in the U.S. only]
IMAGES: Production stills from the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 1 episode, Spirituality, 2001. © Art21, Inc. 2001.

We can’t wait for James Turrell: A Retrospective to open at LACMA later this month. Advance tickets (highly recommended) go on sale on Wednesday. Unless, of course, you’re a member, in which case you can reserve yours now.


Beyond psyched for the LACMA retrospective. Angelenos, get ready.
lacma:

art21:

“Generally, we use light—we don’t really pay much attention to light itself. That’s my interest: this fascination with light and how we come to light.” —James Turrell
Happy birthday today (May 6) to artist James Turrell.
Seen here is the The Light Inside (1999), commissioned by and installed at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. The Light Inside is installed in the underground tunnel that links the museum’s Caroline Wiess Law Building with the Audrey Jones Beck Building.
This scene is featured in the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 1 episode, Spirituality (2001).
WATCH James Turrell in Spirituality: Preview | Full Segment [available in the U.S. only]
IMAGES: Production stills from the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 1 episode, Spirituality, 2001. © Art21, Inc. 2001.

We can’t wait for James Turrell: A Retrospective to open at LACMA later this month. Advance tickets (highly recommended) go on sale on Wednesday. Unless, of course, you’re a member, in which case you can reserve yours now.


Beyond psyched for the LACMA retrospective. Angelenos, get ready.
lacma:

art21:

“Generally, we use light—we don’t really pay much attention to light itself. That’s my interest: this fascination with light and how we come to light.” —James Turrell
Happy birthday today (May 6) to artist James Turrell.
Seen here is the The Light Inside (1999), commissioned by and installed at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. The Light Inside is installed in the underground tunnel that links the museum’s Caroline Wiess Law Building with the Audrey Jones Beck Building.
This scene is featured in the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 1 episode, Spirituality (2001).
WATCH James Turrell in Spirituality: Preview | Full Segment [available in the U.S. only]
IMAGES: Production stills from the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 1 episode, Spirituality, 2001. © Art21, Inc. 2001.

We can’t wait for James Turrell: A Retrospective to open at LACMA later this month. Advance tickets (highly recommended) go on sale on Wednesday. Unless, of course, you’re a member, in which case you can reserve yours now.


Beyond psyched for the LACMA retrospective. Angelenos, get ready.
+