christine on her own
A Los Angeles gal now in San Francisco, discovering a new city and museum, while filling my mind with art, food, fashion, design, books, and places I've never been to.

This Tumblr started when I discovered myself on my own. And though there are many incredible people in my life, including my partner and co-adventurer P, I still consider this a place of my own to think, explore, share, and be inspired.
christine on her own
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Even though I haven’t lived in downtown LA yet, it’s where I’ve felt most home. It’s been exciting to see another resurgence, lately along Broadway Street. From an anchor like Ace Hotel to new storefronts Acne Studios and Tanner Goods, and not to mention restaurants sprouting up nearly monthly, the historic core has been transformed.
What’s most invigorating is the diversity, which I hope never changes. On this visit, I encountered neighborhood locals, others like me on an afternoon jaunt, and a block away, a major immigration protest that was slowly closing down streets. Some may call it strange or ugly or chaotic, but I find it all part of that special LA energy one can only grow to appreciate.
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tumblangeles:

The new Ace Hotel is now open in DTLA, including L.A. Chapter for breakfast/drinks and Stumptown for coffee.

Cannot wait to visit
tumblangeles:

The new Ace Hotel is now open in DTLA, including L.A. Chapter for breakfast/drinks and Stumptown for coffee.

Cannot wait to visit
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anon-y-mouse:

6th Street Bridge - Los Angeles
Anon-Y-Mouse Print & Design 2013


I love how subtle LA’s architectural beauty is
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Talking life and everything in between on a hike with the bestie. Only in LA can you take in such stunning ocean views on a 75 degree December day (at Temescal Canyon)
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Although I love the familiar sight and sounds of hearing kids running through this Soto installation, this is quite possibly the most luminescent I have ever seen it (at Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA))
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I could hardly recognize the arts district anymore during an afternoon with the bestie and P. Hopping from a local coffee roaster to a home design space to new boutiques, it’s exciting to see all the new developments in one of my favorite LA neighborhoods.
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bookmania:

“There is a place. Like no place on Earth. A land full of wonder, mystery, and danger!”
The Last BookstoreLos Angeles, California
(via eversolightly)


Big on the to do list
bookmania:

“There is a place. Like no place on Earth. A land full of wonder, mystery, and danger!”
The Last BookstoreLos Angeles, California
(via eversolightly)


Big on the to do list
bookmania:

“There is a place. Like no place on Earth. A land full of wonder, mystery, and danger!”
The Last BookstoreLos Angeles, California
(via eversolightly)


Big on the to do list
bookmania:

“There is a place. Like no place on Earth. A land full of wonder, mystery, and danger!”
The Last BookstoreLos Angeles, California
(via eversolightly)


Big on the to do list
bookmania:

“There is a place. Like no place on Earth. A land full of wonder, mystery, and danger!”
The Last BookstoreLos Angeles, California
(via eversolightly)


Big on the to do list
bookmania:

“There is a place. Like no place on Earth. A land full of wonder, mystery, and danger!”
The Last BookstoreLos Angeles, California
(via eversolightly)


Big on the to do list
bookmania:

“There is a place. Like no place on Earth. A land full of wonder, mystery, and danger!”
The Last BookstoreLos Angeles, California
(via eversolightly)


Big on the to do list
bookmania:

“There is a place. Like no place on Earth. A land full of wonder, mystery, and danger!”
The Last BookstoreLos Angeles, California
(via eversolightly)


Big on the to do list
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That LA view
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Can’t wait to spend some quality time in LA
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Indulging in one of my favorite LA meals before visiting Mama Choi in the hospital (at Pho Cafe)
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lacma:

Here it is: photos of Peter Zumthor’s proposed new building for LACMA. See & share even more here.
Over on Unframed, LACMA’s director Michael Govan writes about the years of thought that have gone into this project:
What if, instead of being hidden, a museum’s collections were visible even when they were in storage? What if art objects could be methodically rotated to describe many cultural stories and not just one chronological and geographic historical narrative? What if there could be a comfortable and seamless transition from the casual space of an outdoor plaza to the inner sanctum of a meditative gallery? Could a museum have lots of windows to see outside, could kids be accommodated as easily as art historians, and could an arrangement of coincident spaces be suited to contemplation, education, or just hanging out? And instead of being a notorious energy hog, could a public museum building collect the energy of the sun to give back to its environment? Could the art museum’s architecture be reconsidered from scratch?
You can see these models, and much more, in The Presence of the Past: Peter Zumthor Reconsiders LACMA, opening to members tomorrow and to the public on Sunday.

So exciting to see this project develop, and can’t wait to view the exhibition. From what I’ve seen so far, the plan is bold, thoughtful, forward-looking, open, and very, very different than the museum norm — exactly what LA needs. 
lacma:

Here it is: photos of Peter Zumthor’s proposed new building for LACMA. See & share even more here.
Over on Unframed, LACMA’s director Michael Govan writes about the years of thought that have gone into this project:
What if, instead of being hidden, a museum’s collections were visible even when they were in storage? What if art objects could be methodically rotated to describe many cultural stories and not just one chronological and geographic historical narrative? What if there could be a comfortable and seamless transition from the casual space of an outdoor plaza to the inner sanctum of a meditative gallery? Could a museum have lots of windows to see outside, could kids be accommodated as easily as art historians, and could an arrangement of coincident spaces be suited to contemplation, education, or just hanging out? And instead of being a notorious energy hog, could a public museum building collect the energy of the sun to give back to its environment? Could the art museum’s architecture be reconsidered from scratch?
You can see these models, and much more, in The Presence of the Past: Peter Zumthor Reconsiders LACMA, opening to members tomorrow and to the public on Sunday.

So exciting to see this project develop, and can’t wait to view the exhibition. From what I’ve seen so far, the plan is bold, thoughtful, forward-looking, open, and very, very different than the museum norm — exactly what LA needs. 
lacma:

Here it is: photos of Peter Zumthor’s proposed new building for LACMA. See & share even more here.
Over on Unframed, LACMA’s director Michael Govan writes about the years of thought that have gone into this project:
What if, instead of being hidden, a museum’s collections were visible even when they were in storage? What if art objects could be methodically rotated to describe many cultural stories and not just one chronological and geographic historical narrative? What if there could be a comfortable and seamless transition from the casual space of an outdoor plaza to the inner sanctum of a meditative gallery? Could a museum have lots of windows to see outside, could kids be accommodated as easily as art historians, and could an arrangement of coincident spaces be suited to contemplation, education, or just hanging out? And instead of being a notorious energy hog, could a public museum building collect the energy of the sun to give back to its environment? Could the art museum’s architecture be reconsidered from scratch?
You can see these models, and much more, in The Presence of the Past: Peter Zumthor Reconsiders LACMA, opening to members tomorrow and to the public on Sunday.

So exciting to see this project develop, and can’t wait to view the exhibition. From what I’ve seen so far, the plan is bold, thoughtful, forward-looking, open, and very, very different than the museum norm — exactly what LA needs. 
lacma:

Here it is: photos of Peter Zumthor’s proposed new building for LACMA. See & share even more here.
Over on Unframed, LACMA’s director Michael Govan writes about the years of thought that have gone into this project:
What if, instead of being hidden, a museum’s collections were visible even when they were in storage? What if art objects could be methodically rotated to describe many cultural stories and not just one chronological and geographic historical narrative? What if there could be a comfortable and seamless transition from the casual space of an outdoor plaza to the inner sanctum of a meditative gallery? Could a museum have lots of windows to see outside, could kids be accommodated as easily as art historians, and could an arrangement of coincident spaces be suited to contemplation, education, or just hanging out? And instead of being a notorious energy hog, could a public museum building collect the energy of the sun to give back to its environment? Could the art museum’s architecture be reconsidered from scratch?
You can see these models, and much more, in The Presence of the Past: Peter Zumthor Reconsiders LACMA, opening to members tomorrow and to the public on Sunday.

So exciting to see this project develop, and can’t wait to view the exhibition. From what I’ve seen so far, the plan is bold, thoughtful, forward-looking, open, and very, very different than the museum norm — exactly what LA needs. 
lacma:

Here it is: photos of Peter Zumthor’s proposed new building for LACMA. See & share even more here.
Over on Unframed, LACMA’s director Michael Govan writes about the years of thought that have gone into this project:
What if, instead of being hidden, a museum’s collections were visible even when they were in storage? What if art objects could be methodically rotated to describe many cultural stories and not just one chronological and geographic historical narrative? What if there could be a comfortable and seamless transition from the casual space of an outdoor plaza to the inner sanctum of a meditative gallery? Could a museum have lots of windows to see outside, could kids be accommodated as easily as art historians, and could an arrangement of coincident spaces be suited to contemplation, education, or just hanging out? And instead of being a notorious energy hog, could a public museum building collect the energy of the sun to give back to its environment? Could the art museum’s architecture be reconsidered from scratch?
You can see these models, and much more, in The Presence of the Past: Peter Zumthor Reconsiders LACMA, opening to members tomorrow and to the public on Sunday.

So exciting to see this project develop, and can’t wait to view the exhibition. From what I’ve seen so far, the plan is bold, thoughtful, forward-looking, open, and very, very different than the museum norm — exactly what LA needs. 
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lacma:

art21:

“Generally, we use light—we don’t really pay much attention to light itself. That’s my interest: this fascination with light and how we come to light.” —James Turrell
Happy birthday today (May 6) to artist James Turrell.
Seen here is the The Light Inside (1999), commissioned by and installed at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. The Light Inside is installed in the underground tunnel that links the museum’s Caroline Wiess Law Building with the Audrey Jones Beck Building.
This scene is featured in the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 1 episode, Spirituality (2001).
WATCH James Turrell in Spirituality: Preview | Full Segment [available in the U.S. only]
IMAGES: Production stills from the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 1 episode, Spirituality, 2001. © Art21, Inc. 2001.

We can’t wait for James Turrell: A Retrospective to open at LACMA later this month. Advance tickets (highly recommended) go on sale on Wednesday. Unless, of course, you’re a member, in which case you can reserve yours now.


Beyond psyched for the LACMA retrospective. Angelenos, get ready.
lacma:

art21:

“Generally, we use light—we don’t really pay much attention to light itself. That’s my interest: this fascination with light and how we come to light.” —James Turrell
Happy birthday today (May 6) to artist James Turrell.
Seen here is the The Light Inside (1999), commissioned by and installed at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. The Light Inside is installed in the underground tunnel that links the museum’s Caroline Wiess Law Building with the Audrey Jones Beck Building.
This scene is featured in the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 1 episode, Spirituality (2001).
WATCH James Turrell in Spirituality: Preview | Full Segment [available in the U.S. only]
IMAGES: Production stills from the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 1 episode, Spirituality, 2001. © Art21, Inc. 2001.

We can’t wait for James Turrell: A Retrospective to open at LACMA later this month. Advance tickets (highly recommended) go on sale on Wednesday. Unless, of course, you’re a member, in which case you can reserve yours now.


Beyond psyched for the LACMA retrospective. Angelenos, get ready.
lacma:

art21:

“Generally, we use light—we don’t really pay much attention to light itself. That’s my interest: this fascination with light and how we come to light.” —James Turrell
Happy birthday today (May 6) to artist James Turrell.
Seen here is the The Light Inside (1999), commissioned by and installed at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. The Light Inside is installed in the underground tunnel that links the museum’s Caroline Wiess Law Building with the Audrey Jones Beck Building.
This scene is featured in the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 1 episode, Spirituality (2001).
WATCH James Turrell in Spirituality: Preview | Full Segment [available in the U.S. only]
IMAGES: Production stills from the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 1 episode, Spirituality, 2001. © Art21, Inc. 2001.

We can’t wait for James Turrell: A Retrospective to open at LACMA later this month. Advance tickets (highly recommended) go on sale on Wednesday. Unless, of course, you’re a member, in which case you can reserve yours now.


Beyond psyched for the LACMA retrospective. Angelenos, get ready.
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Neat new cafe/hangout/art/study space on La Brea from the last LA visit (at Graffiti)
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Smoggy but still so great (at Griffith Observatory)